Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Too Dumb for Grad School

I spent 3 hours reading 60 pages of text and conjuring up a beautiful Discussion Board post that integrated the literature, outside resources and my own opinion in 70-100 words. And as I went into the course to post my ideas, what did I find?

I read the wrong chapter. I got ahead of myself.

So I spent the day reading another 60 pages, but it took much longer since I had to do it in between calls at work. I finally posted my discussion topic which was still decent, but not the best. In fact, here it is:


In page 109 of the Rubin text, I learned about the three different categories of professions espoused by Maack. The three categories are high-authority (law and medicine), indirect/product-oriented (engineering and architecture) and empowering (education, social work and library science). I feel that while Librarians are certainly professionals, they are not the same as medical doctors. The goals of the industries are different. 

By the same token, I like that she placed LIS in the same group as educators. I have always found that librarians are usually great teachers and attract people who genuinely want to learn something. If an illustration is desired, take a look that this reference post-card sent to the ALA in 1912. There certainly is a long, proud tradition of responding to requests for information. In page 109 of the Rubin text, I learned about the three different categories of professions espoused by Maack. The three categories are high-authority (law and medicine), indirect/product-oriented (engineering and architecture) and empowering (education, social work and library science). I feel that while Librarians are certainly professionals, they are not the same as medical doctors. The goals of the industries are different. 

By the same token, I like that she placed LIS in the same group as educators. I have always found that librarians are usually great teachers and attract people who genuinely want to learn something. If an illustration is desired, take a look that this reference post-card sent to the ALA in 1912. There certainly is a long, proud tradition of responding to requests for information. 

http://libraryhistorybuff.blogspot.com/2011/09/longest-reference-request-on-postal.html

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